Monday, 28 May 2012

Feltus Holler Farm, KY


Typical landscape today

As I left E-Town, two women, out for an early morning jog, flagged me down to ask about my ride. It was the first of several good encounters today. Later I made the first of four stops for refreshments. By chance, it was at the point where my route to the Feltus Holler Farm intersected the official TransAm route. I was delighted to find Miles there, joined soon after by Alan and Andy, the three British cyclists I last saw in Virginia. I had continued to read Andy's blog regularly, and also Ed's; he has been riding with them a lot. After we'd sat around chatting for a while, I was about to leave when Don and Dottie arrived. All five were on their way from Hodgenville to Rough River Dam.

At about 9:20am I crossed from the Eastern to the Central time zone, set my watch back an hour, then cycled the hour to 9:20am all over again. There was no sign announcing the transition, perhaps to avoid having motorists take their eyes off the road to fiddle with their watches. The change puts me 15 instead of 14 hours behind Australian Eastern Standard time. It's interesting that Kentucky is split between two time zones, something the Australian states have always refused to allow.

Live snake on the road
For most of the day, I cycled down US 62-W, the same road I was on yesterday. Traffic on this public holiday was light. It got progressively hotter to the point where I felt I was cycling in a furnace. Mid-morning, a breeze got up from the south. It didn't help me in my south-westward direction but had a cooling effect. Some clouds covered the sun for the last part of the ride, giving some relief.

Cyclist cabin
It was 86 km to the head of the farm driveway, then 660 m of hilly gravel lane to the house, where I was given a warm welcome by Beth and Garry. I have the air-conditioned cyclist cabin to myself, complete with bed and shower. In the main house, I was able to run my clothes through the washer and tap into the wifi.

The tornado-resistant main house
Beth is a former President of the Grayson County Clothesline of Quilts Project and has painted many of the quilt patterns on barns. She sells her work through the site linked here.


Caitlin, Beth and Garry

In the evening, Garry, Beth and niece Caitlin cooked a splendid dinner and we had some good conversation. They are friendly and hospitable people and I enjoyed a delightful evening in their beautiful home.

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